PUBLISHED:

Mahala Mullins wasn’t your average moonshiner. In fact, through the mid-1800s she was one of the most notorious sellers of illicit whiskey in Tennessee. It wasn’t that the government didn’t know about her. They did. It’s just that, whenever they came to arrest her, they couldn’t…quite…get…her…out of the house.

That’s because she tipped the scales at well over 600 pounds.

From her bedside, she’d pour and sell whiskey to locals, confident in her immunity from any sort of punishment. She lived in a remote area in the Hancock County mountains, so even if the revenue agents made it all the way up to her house, they’d never be able to lug her back down. Because of this, lawmen would say she’s “Catch-able, but not Fetch-able.”

But Mahala’s story wasn’t without its own share of sadness. Her husband was an invalid for most of his life, and her two sons died in early adulthood. So Mahala had them all buried just outside her door, so that she could see their graves and mourn their passing without having to leave her house.

There’s much more to Mahala’s story. And to hear it, visit the Hancock County Welcome Center in Sneedville: http://overhomesneedville.com/index.html